A Community Approach to Caring for Creation

When Pope Francis talks about care for creation, he almost always pairs it with conversations of unity amongst humanity. In his 2015 encyclical, Laudato Si’, he makes strong statements about the necessity of Christians, theists, and all humans working together to care for our common home. Furthermore, since the encyclical’s release, Pope Francis has consistently modeled how creation care provides a common-ground initiative on which people of faith can and must collaborate.

In the fall of 2015, a few months after Laudato Si’s release, the Catholic Church officially joined the Orthodox Church and other Christian denominations in their tradition of a World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation on September 1st, with a Season of Creation that extends from that day until the feast day of the patron of ecology, St. Francis of Assisi, on October 4th. This year, Pope Francis and the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew issued the first ever joint message on the World Day of Prayer for Creation.

The collaboration that Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew call for reaches beyond faith communities to include social, economic, political, and cultural spheres. “The urgent call and challenge to care for creation are an invitation for all of humanity to work towards sustainable and integral development,” say the faith leaders. “We are convinced that there can be no sincere and enduring resolution to the challenge of the ecological crisis and climate change unless the response is concerted and collective, unless the responsibility is shared and accountable, unless we give priority to solidarity and service.”

During 2017, Bishop Christopher Coyne of the Diocese of Burlington invited the faithful of Vermont to celebrate a Year of Creation, an intentional, heightened focus on embracing the message of Laudato Si’. The initiative began with the convening of an interfaith and professionally diverse Year of Creation committee that would meet monthly to discuss, plan, and reflect upon events that would be welcoming and encouraging to all. Through these events and initiatives, the Diocese of Burlington collaborated with other community groups that are working toward a common goal of sustainability.

As we move forward from this year’s Season of Creation, consider ways that your church can engage with the local community in caring for the earth and all who call it home. Here are a few ideas of ways to get started:

1. Form a relationship with a public purpose energy service company.

The Diocese of Burlington works with Commons Energy to bring affordable energy efficiency audits and projects to diocesan buildings.

2. Connect with local faith and ecology organizations and affiliates.

Vermont Catholic communities are encouraged to apply for a matching grant from Vermont Interfaith Power and Light’s Katy Gerke Memorial Program to help fund energy efficiency audits and projects.

3. Learn from your solid waste management district.

The Chittenden Solid Waste District taught Vermont diocesan staff about what happens to something after it’s thrown in the trash and how properly disposing of materials saves time, money, resources, and the planet! Staff learned how to properly use the new compost bins around the office and the importance of reaching for re-useable options (metal silverware, ceramic coffee mugs, etc.), rather than disposable ones, to counteract “throwaway culture.”

4. Eat locally.

Local restaurants and bakeries supported the Diocese of Burlington’s efforts to highlight the impact that dietary choices have on the state of creation. By serving and promoting a combination of meat-free, dairy-free, locally-sourced, and organic options during presentations on the history of fasting in the Catholic faith and fasting for justice, the Church was able to support choosing local restaurants, bakeries, and farms as well.

Stephanie Clary is Manager of Mission Outreach and Communication at the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington.


Going Deeper!

See our WeAreSaltAndLight.org feature story on the Diocese of Burlington’s Year of Creation. Use this handout to celebrate the Season of Creation, which continues through October 4.

 

Prayers, Patrons and the Paris Agreement

Protesters carry a globe-shaped balloon in front of Rome's Colosseum during a Nov. 29 rally, the day before the start of the U.N. climate change conference in Paris. (CNS photo/Alessandro Bianchi, Reuters) See COP21-VATICAN-PAROLIN Dec. 1, 2015.

Protesters carry a globe-shaped balloon in front of Rome’s Colosseum during a Nov. 29 rally, the day before the start of the U.N. climate change conference in Paris. (CNS photo/Alessandro Bianchi, Reuters)

This year something special happened the day after the Feast of St. Francis, and one could even wonder if it had anything to do with the saint’s patronage. “This is a momentous occasion,” said United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon. “What once seemed unthinkable, is now unstoppable.” On October 5, 2016, the so-called Paris Agreement, or COP21, was ratified. The Paris Agreement refers to negotiations between 195 countries to curb greenhouse gas emissions globally. The non-binding agreement establishes that nations must reduce their carbon dioxide emissions in order to keep global temperatures well below a two-degree Celsius increase in relation to pre-industrial levels. Once 55 countries representing over 55% of the worlds emissions signed the agreement, it would be ratified. That ratification threshold was reached on October 5, 2016, when the European Union signed the agreement. The agreement will now be implemented on November 4, one month after the Feast of St. Francis. But the story of the Catholic relationship to the Paris agreement is more than a happy coincidence of dates.

Days before the Paris meeting in December, 2015, Pope Francis said: “The climate is a common good, belonging to all and meant for all…Climate change is a global problem with grave implications: environmental, social, economic, political and for the distribution of goods; it represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity in our day (Laudato Si’, 23 and 25) … In a few days an important meeting on climate change will be held in Paris, where the international community as such will once again confront these issues. It would be sad, and I dare say even catastrophic, were particular interests to prevail over the common good and lead to manipulating information in order to protect their own plans and projects.”

Pope Francis was a champion of the Paris meeting from the beginning and called on political leaders to rise to the challenge to reach a global agreement. The Italian minister of the environment, Gian Luca Galletti, affirmed the Paris agreement might not have happened without Pope Francis. In his own speech at the Paris meeting the minister reminded all members that the pope in “His encyclical letter Laudato Si’ has offered to us the highest moral contribution on the environmental question.” The pope shifted the conversation about climate change from economic, political, scientific, and legal issues into a broader moral and ethical debate, which allowed everyone to participate. This change in tone and substance made room for a global conversation, and also a global agreement, to which no one could be indifferent.

Christians can celebrate this important agreement as not only a sign of promise for reducing pollution and protecting the environment, but also as a sign of unity among nations, collaboration, and mutual understanding. However, this agreement is only one step on a long road. Pope Francis is also a practical man, and commenting on the Paris agreement he warns of the danger of much talk and little action: “I am similarly confident that the Paris Conference on Climatic Change will secure fundamental and effective agreements. Solemn commitments, however, are not enough, although they are certainly a necessary step toward solutions… we must avoid every temptation to fall into a declarationist nominalism which would assuage our consciences. We need to ensure that our institutions are truly effective.”

In order to be “truly effective” in implementing the Paris agreement the task at hand is tremendous. The underlying assumption is that to be able to stay below a two-degree temperature increase what is necessary is that the world reach a net zero emission of carbon somewhere between 2050 and 2100. This simply means a complete overhaul of the global energy system as we know it. Cardinal Turkson, recognized as responsible for drafting Laudato Si’, is well aware of the consequences: “the global community has drawn a red line under a rise in global temperatures of two degrees Celsius. This is will require a complete shift away from fossil fuels toward renewables by about 2070. This is a momentous undertaking.” The pope himself mentioned that the Paris Agreement “represents an important stage in the process of developing a new energy system which depends on a minimal use of fossil fuels, aims at energy efficiency, and makes use of energy sources with little or no carbon content. We are faced with a great political and economic obligation to rethink and correct the dysfunctions and distortions of the current model of development.”

Now it is up to each country, each region and legislature, and ultimately each person, to discern in their own realities how it is they are to contribute to this common cause. Politicians will have their hands full deliberating on how this “momentous task” is to be reached. Furthermore, we must remember that for the pope, the environmental goal of reducing carbon emissions is not a stand-alone cause, but must be integrated into other goals and oriented by higher principles. This “integral ecology” is the organizing logic of Laudato Si’ and articulates the Catholic Church’s support for environmental causes while always ensuring the well-being of people and respect for God himself. The efforts to address climate change must have the dignity of the human person, every person and the whole person, front and center. In Pope Francis’ own words:

“I express my hope that COP21 will achieve a global and “transformational” agreement based on the principles of solidarity, justice, equality and participation; an agreement which targets three complex and interdependent goals: lessening the impact of climate change, fighting poverty and ensuring respect for human dignity… government leaders must do everything possible to ensure that all can have the minimum spiritual and material means needed to live in dignity and to create and support a family, which is the primary cell of any social development. In practical terms, this absolute minimum has three names: lodging, labour, and land; and one spiritual name: spiritual freedom, which includes religious freedom, the right to education and all other civil rights… These pillars of integral human development have a common foundation, which is the right to life and, more generally, what we could call the right to existence of human nature itself.”

Ricardo Simmonds, Environmental Policy Advisor, USCCB

Ricardo Simmonds is the Environmental Policy Advisor for the Office of Domestic Social Development, within the Department of Justice, Peace and Human Development of the USCCB.


Going Deeper

Learn ways you and your community can help care for Creation with these ten practical suggestions from the Diocese of Stockton.

7 Ways to Be a Good Steward of the Harvest

“The earth has yielded its harvest; God, our God, blesses us.”

— Psalm 67:7

Koubra Mahamat Abakar, 44 years old, and her daughters harvest fresh fruit and vegetables in her community garden based in Kournan village, Chad. Photo by Michael Stulman/CRS

Koubra Mahamat Abakar, 44 years old,  harvests fresh fruit and vegetables in her community garden based in Kournan village, Chad. Photo by Michael Stulman/CRS

Fall, the season of harvest, is the perfect time to reflect on the Earth’s abundance. Yet, not all people have their share of the abundance God has given us. Approximately 800 million people suffer from hunger worldwide.

On October 16, World Food Day 2016 takes these overlapping issues into account with its theme, “Climate is changing. Food and agriculture must too.” As the pope reminds us in Laudato Si’, we must recognize our call to respond to “the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.” In observance of World Food Day, we invite you to use the following seven steps in your daily life to become a better steward of Earth’s harvests:

  1. Waste less. Did you know that one-third of the food produced for human consumption is either lost during production or wasted by consumers? When we waste food, we’re discarding food that could have fed our hungry brothers and sisters. Food waste also has a grave environmental impact, as it accounts for 8% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. SaveTheFood.com has tips on how to reduce food waste, including information on proper storage of produce, advice on freezing leftovers and guides for planning meals so you’re sure to eat everything you buy.
  2. Eat simply. It takes 8 times more water to produce 1 pound of beef than to produce 1 pound of soybeans. Eating meat-free, even if only for a couple of days each week, puts less of a strain on Earth’s resources and makes more food and water available for our human family. Check out CRS Rice Bowl’s archive of meatless meal recipes for delicious ways to eat simply!
  3. Support farmers. Buying food locally is not only a great way to support the livelihoods of farmers in your community, but it also reduces your carbon footprint, since your food isn’t being transported great distances to be sold. Find a farmers market near you!
  4. Advocate. U.S. policies impact people worldwide. Let Congress know you care about hunger by lending your voice to support policies that help the most vulnerable.
  5. Donate. CRS is partnering with farmers around the world whose incomes have been jeopardized by the changing environment. These farmers are learning new skills and techniques so that they are still able to generate an income and put food on the table. By supporting CRS, you are supporting these farmers and others who face the effects of natural disaster and hunger.
  6. Learn more. Building awareness about hunger and changing weather patterns is an essential step toward positive change. Take some time to educate yourself and your community on these issues and the many ways that they are connected to each other.
  7. Pray. Prayer helps us to be in right relationship, not only with God and our neighbor, but also with all of creation. Use CRS’ “Live Mercy: Feed the Hungry” small group faith-sharing resource to help your community reflect on this important issue. Or, pray this short prayer before meals to remain mindful of the harvest that we’re called to steward and share.

CRS Helping Hands is a meal-packaging program for Catholic parishes, schools and universities. Learn how to bring CRS Helping Hands to your community!


 

HeadshotRachel Malinowski is a US Operations program officer with Catholic Relief Services, operating out of CRS headquarters in Baltimore.  She works on Helping Hands, among other programs. 

CRS Student Ambassadors: Inspired to be Light in the World

young brunette woman in a blue floral dress

Rita Marino, CRS Student Ambassador at Villanova University

In life, it is so easy to turn a blind eye to the plight of others. Perhaps our lives appear too hectic or the issues too large. However, despite distance, race or circumstance, we are all brothers and sisters—part of God’s family. Our everyday decisions impact both the people and the environment around the globe.

It is when we disconnect from the consequences of our actions that the world suffers. It is when we fail to curb our material consumption, ignore the cries of those in pain, and worry only about ourselves, that we fall out of harmony with each other.

July 24, 2016, marked the beginning of a special multiday event where almost 120 students and staff, representing 47 colleges across the nation, united in Baltimore for the Catholic Relief Services Student Ambassador Leaders Together, or SALT, summit.

During the conference, ambassadors and advisors learned more about CRS’ primary concerns for the year—climate change, human trafficking, and migration, while indulging in fair trade coffee, and receiving training to strengthen collegiate chapters.

As a participant in the conference, I cannot shake the feeling of global interconnectedness, after hearing presentations about displaced Syrian families seeking resettlement, farms in Indonesia yielding miniature-sized corn because of climate change, and battered young women being coerced into sex trafficking. I realize just how connected we are as human beings.

In the words of CRS President and CEO Dr. Carolyn Y. Woo, who spoke at the summit, “You are too young to be hopeless.” The world’s problems may appear too big of a hurdle, but it is our responsibility as Catholics—and as human beings—to approach both people and the land with love and respect.

One of the most important aspects of our hope is that although it may exist abstractly in our hearts, it is expressed tangibly in our actions. Ambassadors and staff possess the knowledge and conviction to not only hope for a better world, but also to actualize it. This was demonstrated on the last day of the summit when students met with U.S. senators and representatives to advocate for policies that support solidarity.

On my campus at Villanova University, we are living solidarity through efforts to combat climate change and help Syrian refugees. During the 2015-2016 school year, Villanova Ambassadors collected hundreds of advocacy letters for climate change during the Theology Colloquium, cosponsored the 3rd annual interfaith prayer vigil to benefit Syrian refugees, and organized a “5k run for refugees.” We look forward to seeing how we will incorporate the three issues of climate change, human trafficking, and migration into our work in this coming school year.

Through education, courage and our voices, positive change arises. May the year 2016-2017 school year be filled with strength and love.

Rita Marino is a CRS Student Ambassador at Villanova University. She is a fall 2016 intern for the CRS Northeast and Mid-Atlantic office and a blogger for the CRS University blog.

The Catholic Relief Services SALT Summit brought together college and university student leaders and advisors July 24–26 to learn how to organize and engage their campuses to work for global solidarity through CRS. Watch this video from Catholic News Service to learn more about their efforts:

Through the CRS Student Ambassador program, CRS trains chapters of student leaders to mobilize their peers and bring to life the mission of global solidarity on campus.

10 Ways You Can Celebrate Earth Day!

three women extend their armfulls of green leaves with white text: "Whether believers or not, we are agreed today that the earth is essentially a shared inheritance, whose fruits are meant to benefit everyone." (93) #LaudatoSi Photo from Jennifer Hardy, CRSEarth Day (April 22)  is the perfect time to help Catholics in your area respond to Pope Francis’ call to “be ‘protectors’ of creation”!

Here are ten ways you can celebrate Earth Day!

1. Get Catholic Climate Covenant’s free, downloadable Earth Day 2016 Program Guide.

2. Watch the video on Care for God’s Creation from the Catholic Social Teaching 101 video series by Catholic Relief Servics and USCCB.

3. With family or friends, pray this Laudato Si’ prayer in English  and Spanish.

4. Use these resources for liturgy and preaching on the Sunday before or after Earth Day to call attention to our role in caring for God’s creation.

preschool children at a Catholic school use a watering can to water seedlings as they learn about Care for creation

5. Learn how local community organizations, including those funded by the Catholic Campaign for Human Development, are addressing environmental issues. Join their efforts!

6. Gather with a group of friends and reflect on Laudato Si’ using USCCB’s discussion guide in English and Spanish.

bright and colorful covers of two illustrated children's books "Green Street Park" and "Drop by Drop" with URL loyolapress.com/twofeetoflove7. Gift Green Street Park or Drop by Drop to your parish’s religious education program or school.  Both of these children’s books are about kids caring for creation.

8. Get inspired by what others are doing to Act Together to care for creation.

Pope Francis carries his crosier held together with a splint and tape as he arrives in procession to celebrate Mass at Kosevo stadium in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, June 6. The photo is accompanied by white text: "We are not faced with two separate crises, one envronmental and the other social, but one rather complex crisis which is both social and environmental." Laudato Si #139 (CNS photo/Max Rossi, Reuters)

9. Share this Laudato Si’ bullet insert, in English and Spanish, in your parish.

10. Advocate! Participate in this current action alert.

 

How will you celebrate Earth Day? Let us know in the comments below.

¿Cómo podemos responder al llamado del papa Francisco a cuidar de nuestra casa común?

La Cuaresma, la intención de oración del papa Francisco y las lecciones de su viaje a México

Justamente este mes en su video de intención de oración, el papa Francisco pidió a la gente de todo el mundo que “cuidemos de la creación” y de nuestra casa común. Hizo hincapié en que tanto “[c]reyentes y no creyentes estamos de acuerdo en que la tierra es una herencia común, cuyos frutos deben beneficiar a todos”. Él nos llama a reconocer “[l]a relación entre la pobreza y la fragilidad del planeta”.

Durante su visita a México la semana pasada, el papa Francisco dio testimonio de los efectos de la exclusión social, económica y ambiental al poner a los marginados —migrantes, presos, trabajadores y pueblos indígenas— en el centro de su viaje. A través de su visita a Chiapas el papa envió un poderoso mensaje. Allí se alzó en solidaridad con la población indígena del país, que viene resistiéndose cada vez más a los abusos a los derechos humanos y ambientales.

En una santa Misa con representantes de las comunidades indígenas de Chiapas, el papa Francisco exclamó que no podemos ignorar el clamor de la Creación, diciendo que “entre los pobres más abandonados y maltratados, está nuestra oprimida y devastada tierra”.

En su homilía en Chiapas, el papa Francisco dijo:

Esta hermana clama por el daño que le provocamos a causa del uso irresponsable y del abuso de los bienes que Dios ha puesto en ella. Hemos crecido pensando que éramos sus propietarios y dominadores, autorizados a expoliarla. La violencia que hay en el corazón humano, herido por el pecado, también se manifiesta en los síntomas de enfermedad que advertimos en el suelo, en el agua, en el aire y en los seres vivientes. Por eso, entre los pobres más abandonados y maltratados, está nuestra oprimida y devastada tierra, que “gime y sufre dolores de parto” (Rm 8,22)” (Laudato si’, 2). El desafío ambiental que vivimos, y sus raíces humanas, nos impactan a todos (cf. Laudato si’, 14) y nos interpelan. Ya no podemos hacernos los sordos frente a una de las mayores crisis ambientales de la historia.

A la luz de las crisis ambientales que enfrentamos y el clamor de la Creación y los pobres, el papa Francisco reitera su llamado a que examinemos el camino que estamos recorriendo y que hagamos un examen de conciencia: “Qué bien nos haría a todos hacer un examen de conciencia y aprender a decir: ¡Perdón!, ¡perdón, hermanos! El mundo de hoy, despojado por la cultura del descarte, los necesita”.

Si miramos alrededor, vemos muchos signos de esta “cultura del descarte”, que se deshace de cosas y personas como “sobrantes”, ya sean las personas sin hogar que viven en nuestras calles, los trabajadores que producen bienes de consumo baratos por salarios ínfimos en las maquilas de Juárez, o los pueblos indígenas que han sido desplazados de sus tierras o las han visto contaminadas por otros “mareados por el poder, el dinero y las leyes del mercado”.

El papa Francisco, durante este periodo de Cuaresma, nos llama a examinar nuestros pasos y el camino actual que estamos recorriendo, para rechazar una “cultura del descarte” y abrazar una cultura de solidaridad y encuentro.

El papa Francisco llama a la Iglesia y al mundo a reconocer la urgencia de nuestros desafíos ambientales y sumarse a él en embarcarse en un nuevo camino. Como dijo el papa Francisco durante su visita a nuestra nación, “Ahora es el tiempo de acciones valientes y de estrategias para implementar una ‘cultura del cuidado’ y una ‘aproximación integral para combatir la pobreza, para devolver la dignidad a los excluidos y simultáneamente para cuidar la naturaleza’”.

Como individuos, podemos adoptar medidas importantes para responder al llamado del papa Francisco de cuidar nuestra casa común examinando nuestro estilo de vida, reduciendo nuestro consumo y siendo conscientes de nuestras opciones. También podemos contribuir a una escala más amplia a un cambio duradero trabajando activamente dentro de nuestras comunidades para abordar los desafíos ambientales en nuestros barrios, pueblos y ciudades, y promoviendo políticas ambientales que protejan a los pobres y vulnerables en nuestro país y en todo el mundo.

¿Cómo responderá usted al llamado del papa Francisco a cuidar de nuestra casa común?

Francisco nos recuerda que “[n]o hay que pensar que esos esfuerzos no van a cambiar el mundo. Esas acciones derraman un bien en la sociedad que siempre produce frutos más allá de lo que se pueda constatar, porque provocan en el seno de esta tierra un bien que siempre tiende a difundirse” (Laudato si’, 212).

Profundice:

  • ¿Existe una organización comunitaria local a la que pueda unirse (o crear) para promover el bien común y construir una ecología integral? Para encontrar un grupo de la CCHD, busque en el sitio web PobrezaUSA. Eche un vistazo a las Historias de esperanza para informarse de cómo organizaciones apoyadas por la Campaña Católica para el Desarrollo Humano están trabajando por la justicia ambiental.
  • Y para empezar la conversación en su parroquia o comunidad local, mire la guía de discusión y otros recursos educativos sobre la encíclica en el sitio web del Programa de Justicia Ambiental de la USCCB.
  • Infórmese de cómo las comunidades católicas en todos los Estados Unidos, incluyendo parroquias, diócesis, escuelas y comunidades religiosas, están cuidando de la creación, en WeAreSaltAndLight.org.
  • ¡Apoye el llamado del papa Francisco a cuidar de nuestra casa común! Diga a sus senadores que cuiden de la creación ayudando a organizaciones sin fines de lucro a hacer mejoras necesarias en la eficiencia energética y protegiendo un estándar nacional de carbono.
  • Adopte la Promesa de San Francisco de cuidar de la Creación y de los pobres. Se trata de una promesa y un compromiso de personas, familias, parroquias y organizaciones católicas de vivir nuestra fe cuidando de la creación de Dios y de los más vulnerables.

ceciliaCecilia Calvo es la coordinadora del Programa de Justicia Ambiental de la USCCB en el Departamento de Justicia, Paz y Desarrollo Humano de la USCCB.

How Can We Respond to Pope Francis’ Call to Care for Our Common Home?

Lent, Pope Francis’ prayer intention and lessons from his trip to Mexico

Just this month in his prayer intention video Pope Francis asked people around the world to “take good care of creation” and to care for our common home. He emphasized, both “[b]elievers and unbelievers agree that the earth is a common heritage, the fruits of which should benefit everyone.” He calls us to recognize “[t]he relationship between poverty and the fragility of the planet.”

During Pope Francis’ visit to Mexico last week he gave testimony to the effects of social, economic, and environmental exclusion by putting those on the margins — migrants, prisoners, workers and indigenous peoples — at the center of his trip. Through his visit to Chiapas the pope sent a powerful message. There he stood in solidarity with the country’s indigenous population, who has increasingly withstood environmental and human rights abuses.

In a holy Mass with representatives of the indigenous communities of Chiapas, Pope Francis exclaimed, we cannot ignore the cries of Creation, the poor and the earth who “is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor.”

In his homily in Chiapas, Pope Francis said:

This sister now cries out to us because of the harm we have inflicted on her by our irresponsible use and abuse of the goods with which God has endowed her. We have come to see ourselves as her lords and masters, entitled to plunder her at will. The violence present in our hearts, wounded by sin, is also reflected in the symptoms of sickness evident in the soil, in the water, in the air and in all forms of life. This is why the earth herself, burdened and laid waste, is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor; she ‘groans in travail’ (Rom 8:22)” (Laudato Si’, 2). The environmental challenge that we are experiencing, and its human causes, affects us all (cf. Laudato Si’, 14) and demands our response. We can no longer remain silent before one of the greatest environmental crises in world history.

In light of the environmental crises we face and the cries of Creation and the poor, Pope Francis reiterates his call for us to examine the path we are traveling on and to examine our conscience: “How worthwhile it would be for each of us to examine our conscience and learn to say, “‘forgive me!’, ‘forgive me, brothers and sisters!’ Today’s world, ravaged as it is by a throwaway culture, needs you!”

If we look around, we see many signs of this “throwaway culture,” which discards things and people as “leftovers,” whether it is the homeless who live on our streets, the workers who produce cheap consumer goods for abysmal wages in the maquilas in Juárez, or the indigenous peoples who have been displaced from their lands or seen them contaminated by others “intoxicated by power, money and market trends.”

Pope Francis, during this period of Lent, call us to examine our steps and the current path we are traveling on, to reject a “throwaway culture,” and to embrace a culture of solidarity and encounter.

Francis calls the Church and the world to acknowledge the urgency of our environmental challenges and to join him in embarking on a new path. As Pope Francis said during his visit to our nation, “Now is the time for courageous actions and strategies, aimed at implementing a ‘culture of care’ and ‘an integrated approach to combating poverty, restoring dignity to the excluded, and at the same time protecting nature.'”

As individuals, we can take important steps to answer Pope Francis’ call to care for our common home by examining our lifestyles, reducing our consumption, and being conscious of our choices. We can also contribute on a broader scale to lasting change by working actively within our communities to address environmental challenges in our neighborhoods, towns and cities, and advocating for environmental policies that protect the poor and vulnerable in our nation and around the world.

How will you respond to Pope Francis’ call to care for our common home?

Francis reminds us that “[w]e must not think that these efforts are not going to change the world. They benefit society, often unbeknown to us, for they call forth a goodness which, albeit unseen, inevitably tends to spread” (Laudato Si’, 212).

Go deeper:

  • Is there a local community organization you can join (or create) to promote the common good and build an integral ecology? To find a CCHD group, look on Poverty USA’s website. Check out the Stories of Hope to learn how organizations supported by the Catholic Campaign for Human Development are working for environmental justice.
  • And to start the conversation in your parish or local community, look at the discussion guide, and other educational resources on the encyclical on the USCCB Environmental Justice Program website.
  • Learn how Catholic communities around the United States, including parishes, dioceses, schools, and religious communities, are caring for creation, at WeAreSaltAndLight.org.
  • Support Pope Francis’ call to care for our common home! Tell your Senators to care for creation by helping nonprofits make needed energy-efficiency improvements and protecting a national carbon standard.
  • Take the St. Francis Pledge to Care for Creation and the Poor. The Pledge is a promise and a commitment by Catholic individuals, families, parishes and organizations to live our faith by caring for God’s Creation and the most vulnerable.
Cecilia Calvo, USCCB

Cecilia Calvo, USCCB

Cecilia Calvo is the coordinator of the USCCB Environmental Justice Program at the USCCB Department of Justice, Peace & Human Development.

 


¿Cómo podemos responder al llamado del papa Francisco a cuidar de nuestra casa común? La Cuaresma, la intención de oración del papa Francisco y las lecciones de su viaje a México

Justamente este mes en su video de intención de oración, el papa Francisco pidió a la gente de todo el mundo que “cuidemos de la creación” y de nuestra casa común. Hizo hincapié en que tanto “[c]reyentes y no creyentes estamos de acuerdo en que la tierra es una herencia común, cuyos frutos deben beneficiar a todos”. Él nos llama a reconocer “[l]a relación entre la pobreza y la fragilidad del planeta”.

Durante su visita a México la semana pasada, el papa Francisco dio testimonio de los efectos de la exclusión social, económica y ambiental al poner a los marginados —migrantes, presos, trabajadores y pueblos indígenas— en el centro de su viaje. A través de su visita a Chiapas el papa envió un poderoso mensaje. Allí se alzó en solidaridad con la población indígena del país, que viene resistiéndose cada vez más a los abusos a los derechos humanos y ambientales.

En una santa Misa con representantes de las comunidades indígenas de Chiapas, el papa Francisco exclamó que no podemos ignorar el clamor de la Creación, diciendo que “entre los pobres más abandonados y maltratados, está nuestra oprimida y devastada tierra”.

En su homilía en Chiapas, el papa Francisco dijo:

Esta hermana clama por el daño que le provocamos a causa del uso irresponsable y del abuso de los bienes que Dios ha puesto en ella. Hemos crecido pensando que éramos sus propietarios y dominadores, autorizados a expoliarla. La violencia que hay en el corazón humano, herido por el pecado, también se manifiesta en los síntomas de enfermedad que advertimos en el suelo, en el agua, en el aire y en los seres vivientes. Por eso, entre los pobres más abandonados y maltratados, está nuestra oprimida y devastada tierra, que “gime y sufre dolores de parto” (Rm 8,22)” (Laudato si’, 2). El desafío ambiental que vivimos, y sus raíces humanas, nos impactan a todos (cf. Laudato si’, 14) y nos interpelan. Ya no podemos hacernos los sordos frente a una de las mayores crisis ambientales de la historia.

A la luz de las crisis ambientales que enfrentamos y el clamor de la Creación y los pobres, el papa Francisco reitera su llamado a que examinemos el camino que estamos recorriendo y que hagamos un examen de conciencia: “Qué bien nos haría a todos hacer un examen de conciencia y aprender a decir: ¡Perdón!, ¡perdón, hermanos! El mundo de hoy, despojado por la cultura del descarte, los necesita”.

Si miramos alrededor, vemos muchos signos de esta “cultura del descarte”, que se deshace de cosas y personas como “sobrantes”, ya sean las personas sin hogar que viven en nuestras calles, los trabajadores que producen bienes de consumo baratos por salarios ínfimos en las maquilas de Juárez, o los pueblos indígenas que han sido desplazados de sus tierras o las han visto contaminadas por otros “mareados por el poder, el dinero y las leyes del mercado”.

El papa Francisco, durante este periodo de Cuaresma, nos llama a examinar nuestros pasos y el camino actual que estamos recorriendo, para rechazar una “cultura del descarte” y abrazar una cultura de solidaridad y encuentro.

El papa Francisco llama a la Iglesia y al mundo a reconocer la urgencia de nuestros desafíos ambientales y sumarse a él en embarcarse en un nuevo camino. Como dijo el papa Francisco durante su visita a nuestra nación, “Ahora es el tiempo de acciones valientes y de estrategias para implementar una ‘cultura del cuidado’ y una ‘aproximación integral para combatir la pobreza, para devolver la dignidad a los excluidos y simultáneamente para cuidar la naturaleza’”.

Como individuos, podemos adoptar medidas importantes para responder al llamado del papa Francisco de cuidar nuestra casa común examinando nuestro estilo de vida, reduciendo nuestro consumo y siendo conscientes de nuestras opciones. También podemos contribuir a una escala más amplia a un cambio duradero trabajando activamente dentro de nuestras comunidades para abordar los desafíos ambientales en nuestros barrios, pueblos y ciudades, y promoviendo políticas ambientales que protejan a los pobres y vulnerables en nuestro país y en todo el mundo.

¿Cómo responderá usted al llamado del papa Francisco a cuidar de nuestra casa común?

Francisco nos recuerda que “[n]o hay que pensar que esos esfuerzos no van a cambiar el mundo. Esas acciones derraman un bien en la sociedad que siempre produce frutos más allá de lo que se pueda constatar, porque provocan en el seno de esta tierra un bien que siempre tiende a difundirse” (Laudato si’, 212).

 

Profundice:

  • ¿Existe una organización comunitaria local a la que pueda unirse (o crear) para promover el bien común y construir una ecología integral? Para encontrar un grupo de la CCHD, busque en el sitio web PobrezaUSA. Eche un vistazo a las Historias de esperanza para informarse de cómo organizaciones apoyadas por la Campaña Católica para el Desarrollo Humano están trabajando por la justicia ambiental.
  • Y para empezar la conversación en su parroquia o comunidad local, mire la guía de discusión y otros recursos educativos sobre la encíclica en el sitio web del Programa de Justicia Ambiental de la USCCB.
  • Infórmese de cómo las comunidades católicas en todos los Estados Unidos, incluyendo parroquias, diócesis, escuelas y comunidades religiosas, están cuidando de la creación, en WeAreSaltAndLight.org.
  • ¡Apoye el llamado del papa Francisco a cuidar de nuestra casa común! Diga a sus senadores que cuiden de la creación ayudando a organizaciones sin fines de lucro a hacer mejoras necesarias en la eficiencia energética y protegiendo un estándar nacional de carbono.
  • Adopte la Promesa de San Francisco de cuidar de la Creación y de los pobres. Se trata de una promesa y un compromiso de personas, familias, parroquias y organizaciones católicas de vivir nuestra fe cuidando de la creación de Dios y de los más vulnerables.

Cecilia Calvo es la coordinadora del Programa de Justicia Ambiental de la USCCB en el Departamento de Justicia, Paz y Desarrollo Humano de la USCCB.