V Encuentro: An opportunity in the spirit of the new evangelization

headshot of Marco Raposo

Marco Raposo, Director of the Peace and Justice Ministry, Diocese of El Paso

For the past three years, the Catholic Church in the United States has been on a process towards the V Encuentro, which will take place during 2017 and 2018 from the parish to the national levels. As it is an initiative of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), it is a process intended to involve the entire church and invites everyone to be included.

The V Encuentro is part of an encuentro tradition started back in the 70’s and that finds its ultimate roots in the Latin American church’s spirituality since Vatican II. It is a process of encounter with Jesus as we encounter each other as members of His body. Saint Pope John Paul II tells us about this encounter in his apostolic exhortation Ecclesia in America and Pope Francis has emphasized it since the beginning of his pontificate. Encounter is listening, dialoguing, mutual respect, inclusion, service, and collaboration, as we carry out our mission to evangelize.

The V Encuentro pastoral approach, centered on our call to be missionary disciples, helps us to see who we are as Catholic Hispanics in the United States in the 21st century with all the spiritual, cultural, and social challenges and assets that this entails. The process helps us to focus on the pastoral vision of Jesus for life in abundance for all, to develop our assets as Hispanic Catholics, and put it to the service of the entire Church in the United States, as we work to overcome the many barriers that keep us from achieving that vision. The social dimension of this call to encuentro is very clear.

As we continue the process of preparation for the V Encuentro here in my Diocese of El Paso, this pastoral vision with its strong social dimension has been very helpful to the ministry of peace and justice I coordinate and, even though it is only in its beginning stages, I can see how it will help to strengthen the seeds of this ministry in the parishes where it has been planted and to open furrows to new seeds in those parishes where it is not as strong.

I am full of hope in this V Encuentro, as I perceive it to be a great opportunity for growth through collaboration for the social mission of the church and the ministries of social justice amongst Hispanics and beyond, at the grassroots and the diocesan levels.

I invite you, ministers of peace and justice, to open yourselves to encounter and embrace this opportunity in the spirit of mission of the new evangelization.

Marco Raposo is Diocesan Director of the Peace and Justice Ministry in the Diocese of El Paso.


Going Deeper!

The USCCB Dept. of Justice, Peace and Human Development offers numerous resources to assist Spanish-speaking Catholics in their efforts around social mission.  For example, Dos Pies del Amor en Acción (Two Feet of Love in Action) and Los Sacramentos y la Misión Social (Sacraments and Social Mission) are two of our most popular bilingual resources.

Mass at the border – celebrating our migrant brothers and sisters departed

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November 2nd is the day we Catholics celebrate our faithful departed. On a personal level, we remember those loved ones who walked with us on this life and have gone to the eternal home to continue their life journey. On the church level, we remember them as our brothers and sisters who share a common faith with us and have gone to continue their faith journey in heaven with all the angels and saints.

Here on the border between the U.S. and Mexico, within the dioceses of Las Cruces, El Paso, and Ciudad Juarez, in the month of November, we have a tradition to celebrate Mass right on the border line.

Smack against the border fence, we observe the feast of the faithful departed – Día de los Muertos, as it is known in Mexico and in other countries of Latin America – to pray in supplication and thanksgiving. We remember all our migrant brothers and sisters who have found death on their treacherous journey north, in search of a more dignified life for themselves and their families, often seeking to reunite with their fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, and other relatives.

This tradition started a few decades ago, in the wake of the many border enforcement initiatives enacted to deter migrants from entering this country without inspection. Enforcement operations such as “Hold the Line,” “Gatekeeper,” and “Safeguard” have pushed thousands of people to try to enter through harsh regions and consequently increased the number of deaths along the border.

To honor their lives and call attention to these deaths taking place along with the increasing militarization of the border, these three border dioceses started this beautiful and moving celebration that is now nationally known as the Border Mass.

Several hundred people gather every year on both sides of the border, around a common altar, to celebrate the Eucharist, symbol of communion, in a place that seeks to divide peoples and families. We announce the Gospel of inclusion, remembering that we are all one family of God, called to walk with each other in love. We share the Body of Christ and exchange the sign of peace across the border through the fence, despite opposition from the border patrol officials and ground agents.

The bishops of the three dioceses take turns presiding and the clergy of all three dioceses come to accompany the faithful, as we remember those migrants who have passed on to the eternal life. We pray for them in thanksgiving, for the gifts with which they have enriched the lives of their loved ones and ours. We also pray for change in our hearts, from hardened to welcoming, change in our immigration laws, for immigration reform, and for more Catholic engagement in advocacy so we can enact these changes.

As part of this Mass, we bring symbols of faith and pilgrimage, of migration, suffering, accompaniment, unity and hope. We present an image of the Virgen of Guadalupe as mother and consoler, a backpack, water, sandals, our national flags, and a crucifix representing our common faith in our Lord and Savior, who strengthens and accompanies us all pilgrims, those who are coming, those who arrived, and those who have departed ahead of us.

This is a wonderful moment of prayer and solidarity on the border.

Virgen de Guadalupe, ruega por nosotros! Amen.

headshot of Marco Raposo

Marco Raposo is Diocesan Director of the Peace and Justice Ministry in the Diocese of El Paso.


Visit the  U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Justice for Immigrants Campaign website to learn more about the Church’s work to promote positive immigration reform.

The 2008 film “One Body, One Border” tells the story of the Border Mass. Learn more about the film.