World Day of Peace 2019: Good Politics at the Service of Peace

“Bringing peace is central to the mission of Christ’s disciples. That peace is offered to all those men and women who long for peace amid the tragedies and violence that mark human history.” – Pope Francis, 2019 World Day of Peace Message

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An annual papal message for the World Day of Peace (Jan. 1) has been released every year since 1968. Pope Francis’ World Day of Peace message for 2019, entitled Good Politics at the Service of Peace, is a call to political participation. He reminds us that the Gospel calls us to raise our voices for the common good, for “politics is one of the highest forms of charity.” Advocating for and with communities who are oppressed, disadvantaged, or excluded is a response to our baptismal call to love all members of the Body of Christ, in imitation of Christ’s love.

How can we use our political and social systems to seek peace?

In announcing the theme for this year’s World Day of Peace on January 1, 2019, the Vatican made note of the call to all of us to engage with our civic systems saying, “Political responsibility belongs to every citizen and, in particular, to those that have received the mandate to protect and to govern.” Instead of indifference, cynicism
or thinking our voices do not matter, we believe the Gospel calls us to raise our voices for the common good, for “politics is one of the highest forms of charity.” Advocating for and with communities who are oppressed, disadvantaged, or excluded is a response to our baptismal call to love all members of the Body of Christ, in imitation of Christ’s love. God created human beings as social and relational creatures, made in his own image. We are called to reach out and build relationships of love and justice, making love visible in structures and policies through political engagement. Two areas in which we are called to protect human dignity is in our “concern for the future of life and of the planet, of the youngest and littlest.”

We must work to ensure that the dignity of all is protected is through our political, social, and economic systems. As Pope Francis teaches us in his World Day of Peace Message, these systems must always work to promote peace in our communities. Catholic Social Teaching demands that politics must have a preferential option for the poor and vulnerable, and not be used to promote violence or marginalize those in poverty. Instead, “Good politics is at the service of peace.”

What Can You Do? 

  1. Pray. Pray for the grace to approach all political and social issues from a starting point of faith, love, and a spirit of generosity. You may also try one of the prayer practices at bit.ly/9WaysPray to enrich your experience of prayer for
    peace.
  2. Learn. Civic participation and faithful citizenship requires us to understand the political and social issues that impact our brothers and sisters throughout the world. Visit USCCB resources on Catholic Social Teaching and civic engagement
    to further your knowledge. Read stories of hope to learn how faith communities are answering the call to work for peace and justice.
  3. Act. Join tens of thousands of Catholics to advocate for policies that support justice and peace in the U.S. and those experiencing poverty or conflict around the world. Take action today by visiting confrontglobalpoverty.org. Join 500+ Catholic Advocates on Capitol Hill for the Catholic Social Ministry Gathering (Feb. 2-5, 2019).
Going Deeper!

Learn more about the World Day of Peace by checking out these accompanying resources, including a two-page handout ( also available in en Español) to reflect on Pope Francis’ important invitation to all Catholics and people of good will.

For more ways to raise your voice for the common good throughout the month of January, join us for Poverty Awareness Month! An online and print calendar (also en Español),  longer daily reflections (also en Español) and a pastoral aid for Sunday, January 27, 2019 (also en Español) includes daily ways to learn about poverty, get inspired by how communities are responding, and take action with others. You can also sign up to receive the daily reflections by email.

Pray with Pope Francis: Show Us Your Face

In Gaudete et Exsultate, or Rejoice and Be Glad, Pope Francis asks us to respond to Christ’s invitation to holiness by encountering Jesus’ face in those of our brothers and sisters. This prayer based on Gaudete et Exsultate can be found on the USCCB website in both English and Spanish. You can also purchase copies of Rejoice and Be Glad from the USCCB online store.

Show Us Your Face
Prayer based on Rejoice and Be Glad [Gaudete et Exsultate]

 “Amid the thicket of precepts and prescriptions, Jesus clears a way to seeing two faces, that of the Father and that of our brother. He does not give us two or more formulas or two or more commands. He gives us two faces, or better yet, one alone: the face of God reflected in so many other faces. For in every one of our brothers and sisters, especially the least, the most vulnerable, the defenseless and those in need, God’s very image is found. Indeed, with the scraps of this frail humanity, the Lord will shape his work of art.”

– Pope Francis, Rejoice and Be Glad [Gaudete et Exsultate], no. 61

Father and Creator,

Show us your face reflected in the faces of our brothers and sisters, especially the least, the most vulnerable, the defenseless, and those in need.

In refugee families fleeing violence or war, show us your face.

In those suffering from hunger, show us your face.

In children not yet born, show us your face.

In those enslaved by drug addiction, show us your face.

In parents who work two jobs but still struggle to get by, show us your face.

In those on death row, show us your face.

In young immigrants brought to the U.S. as children, show us your face.

In those aging and alone, show us your face.

In all faces, we know that your divine image is reflected. Help us to recognize always that image.

Help us to work together to protect the dignity of all people—each one created in your image.

Lord, in our families, communities and world shape your final work of art with the scraps of our frail humanity (cf. GE, no. 61).

We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

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Muéstranos tu rostro
Oración basada en Alegraos y Regocijaos (Gaudete et Exsultate)

“En medio de la tupida selva de preceptos y prescripciones, Jesús abre una brecha que permite distinguir dos rostros, el del Padre y el del hermano. No nos entrega dos fórmulas o dos preceptos más. Nos entrega dos rostros, o mejor, uno solo, el de Dios que se refleja en muchos. Porque en cada hermano, especialmente en el más pequeño, frágil, indefenso y necesitado, está presente la imagen misma de Dios. En efecto, el Señor, al final de los tiempos, plasmará su obra de arte con el desecho de esta humanidad vulnerable”.

—Papa Francisco, Alegraos y Regocijaos [Gaudete et Exsultate], no. 61

Padre y Creador,

Muéstranos tu rostro reflejado en los rostros de nuestros hermanos y hermanas, especialmente los más pequeños, los más frágiles, los indefensos y los necesitados.

En las familias de refugiados que huyen de la violencia o la guerra, muéstranos tu rostro.

En los que sufren de hambre en todo el mundo, muéstranos tu rostro.

En los niños aún no nacidos, muéstranos tu rostro.

En los esclavizados por la adicción a las drogas, muéstranos tu rostro.

En los padres que tienen dos trabajos pero aun así luchan por sobrevivir, muéstranos tu rostro.

En los que envejecen y están solos, muéstranos tu rostro.

En todos los rostros sabemos que se refleja tu imagen divina. Ayúdenos a reconocer siempre esa imagen.

Ayúdanos a trabajar juntos para proteger la dignidad de todas las personas, cada una de ellas creadas a tu imagen.

Señor, en nuestras familias, comunidades y mundo plasmamos tu obra de arte final con el desecho de nuestra vulnerable humanidad (cf. GE, no. 61).

Te lo pedimos por Cristo nuestro Señor. Amén.

Copyright © 2018, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. All rights reserved.  This text may be reproduced in whole or in part without alteration for nonprofit educational use, provided such reprints are not sold and include this notice.

Archbishop Kurtz on Charleston

Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz of Louisville, Kentucky, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), responded to the shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, with “grief and deep sadness,” June 19. He said the Catholic community “stands with all people who struggle for an end to racism and violence, in our families, in our places of worship, in our communities and in our world.” He made this statement:

It is with grief and deep sadness that we learned of the tragic murder of Rev. Clementa C. Pinckney and eight members of the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston. There have been far too many heartbreaking losses in the African-American community this year alone. Our prayers are with all those suffering from this heinous crime.

We join our voices with civic and religious leaders in pledging to work for healing and reconciliation. Our efforts must address racism and the violence so visible today. As the U.S. Catholic Bishops said in our pastoral letter on racism, “Racism is not merely one sin among many; it is a radical evil that divides the human family and denies the new creation of a redeemed world. To struggle against it demands an equally radical transformation, in our own minds and hearts as well as in the structure of our society.”

The Catholic community stands with all people who struggle for an end to racism and violence, in our families, in our places of worship, in our communities and in our world. We must continue to build bridges and we must confront racism and violence with a commitment to life, a vision of hope, and a call to action.