Being a “peacemaker” in my own simple way

“Peace I leave you, my peace I give you…”

Lisa M. Hendey, Catholic blogger, author, and speaker

If you spend time online today, perhaps you will see fleeting references to a celebration that is not quite as ubiquitous as Mother’s Day, the Fourth of July, or even St. Patrick’s Day and our annual wearing of the green. Established in 1981 by a unanimous United Nations resolution, the International Day of Peace—a globally shared date to recommit ourselves to worldwide peace—is not exactly a household name or a Hallmark occasion. It may not even be a trending hashtag (#PeaceDay).

But it should be.

The General Assembly of the U.N. has proclaimed a unique and timely theme for this year’s observation: “Together for Peace: Respect, Safety and Dignity for All.” With an emphasis on showing support for migrants and refugees, this year’s commemoration invites us to recommit ourselves to the poignant invitation of Pope Francis in his 2017 Message for the World Day of Peace (promulgated for the 50th World Day of Peace on January 1, 2017):

“All of us want peace. Many people build it day by day through small gestures and acts; many of them are suffering, yet patiently persevere in their efforts to be peacemakers”. In 2017, may we dedicate ourselves prayerfully and actively to banishing violence from our hearts, words and deeds, and to becoming nonviolent people and to building nonviolent communities that care for our common home. “Nothing is impossible if we turn to God in prayer. Everyone can be an artisan of peace”.

Attaining “world peace” may feel overwhelming for those of us who struggle to even find thirty minutes of peaceful dialogue at our family’s dinner tables. When we’re not crossing things off our ever-extending to do lists or racing to a cavalcade of important activities, we spend our free time engaging in a social media culture that feels anything but “peaceful” or playing video games that glorify military domination. We find our “friends” staking out their various strongly felt political and social positions with great vigor. Often, they even find opposing religious teachings or scriptural references to emphasize their rightness. A friendly workplace conversation about current events can devolve quickly into an argument over DACA, the rights of migrants, or the proper implementation of the Church’s social teaching.

Is peace even possible?

In a world where the “poop emoji” is seen as an acceptable form of communication (and yes, I’ve received it in business emails), “peace” may feel like an unattainable fantasy. But today’s commemoration reminds us that as Catholic Christians, we must continually strive to know and live out this particular Fruit of the Holy Spirit in our own homes, parishes, and communities.

While I can work to change domestic policy with respect to the rights of others, I can also be an instrument of peace to those I encounter along my daily path. By engaging in the duties and responsibilities of Faithful Citizenship, I signal my refusal to assume the worst. With my purchasing decisions, my support of charitable institutions, and my treatment of my neighbors, I am called to live out Pope Francis’ call to be a “peacemaker” in my own simple way.

The good news is that you and I are never alone in this pursuit. Just as Christ reminded his disciples that he would be with them when the going got tough, we “believers” find consolation in knowing that banded together, with, in, and through his love, we have companionship for the challenges that feel so insurmountable.

“Behold, the hour is coming and has arrived when each of you will be scattered to his own home and you will leave me alone. But I am not alone, because the Father is with me. I have told you this so that you might have peace in me. In the world you will have trouble, but take courage, I have conquered the world.” John 16:32-33

We know from reading Scripture that Christ’s formula for “conquering the world” did not mean peace through military strength. We worship a king who counsels us to turn the other cheek, to love our neighbors as ourselves, and to care for the least among us. Just as Jesus taught his disciples with parables and his own actions, we teach our children the path to peace with our intentionally loving deeds. These may be hard to muster sometimes, but they speak more loudly than our vitriolic or judgmental words, or even our unfelt or un-acted-upon nice ones.

On a recent Sunday, during the Sign of Peace, I engaged in a quiet moment of prayer as I extended my hand in fellowship with those around me. I pictured each of us leaving our pews, our hands in turn extended to our own concentric circles of love, friendship, professional affiliation, and civic responsibility. How would our world be different if each of our worldly encounters emulated that liturgical wish of “Peace be with you”? What if we stopped to truly look inside the hearts of those we work with, those who serve us, those we endeavor to know more deeply?

Today’s commemoration of the International Day of Peace offers each of us a reminder that with God’s love, all things are possible. Making peace the norm in a divided world won’t just happen because of a “day” or a resolution, but dedicating ourselves “actively and prayerfully” is a terrific place to start. We are, as Pope Francis has reminded us, “artisans of peace”.

Let’s get busy creating.

Lisa M. Hendey is a Catholic blogger, author, and speaker who worships in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. Visit her at www.lisahendey.com.


Going Deeper

Learn how the U.S. Catholic bishops work to promote peace around the world. Learn about how one young adult group is facilitating dialogue for peace.

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