Our Dual Role as Disciples and Americans: the Call to Participate

7-342-Catholics-Care-Catholics-Vote-1Today’s readings and the celebration of Independence Day tomorrow remind us of our dual role as disciples of Christ, and as Americans, and the call to participate in public life as an important way of assisting God’s work to transform the world around us.

In the first reading, the prophet Isaiah (66:10-14c) reflects on the long suffering experienced by God’s people during their time in exile, and describes God’s vision of comfort, restoration, and peace. In what ways do Isaiah’s words of longing resonate with us as we seek to free our communities and world from the oppression of poverty, war, and other violations of human life and dignity?

Yet, the Psalmist reminds us, “Say to God, ‘How tremendous are your deeds!’” (66:3) and Paul proclaims that “new creation” is possible for all in Christ Jesus (Galatians 6:15). We might ask ourselves: how are we called to be part of God’s tremendous deeds as he seeks to transform all of us—including the broken systems and structures that lead to suffering in our world today?

Like the seventy-two disciples sent by Jesus in today’s Gospel (Luke 10:1-12, 17-20), we are sent on a mission. Pope Francis reminds us:

An authentic faith . . . always involves a deep desire to change the world, to transmit values, to leave this earth somehow better than we found it. We love this magnificent planet on which God has put us, and we love the human family which dwells here, with all its tragedies and struggles, it hopes and aspirations, its strengths and weaknesses. The earth is our common home and all of us are brothers and sisters. If indeed “the just ordering of society and of the state is a central responsibility of politics,” the Church, “cannot and must not remain on the sidelines in the fight for justice” (Joy of the Gospel, no. 183).

In their statement on political responsibility, Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship, the U.S. Catholic bishops point to Pope Francis’ words to remind us that working to transform the world around us is part of “our baptismal commitment to follow Jesus Christ and to bear Christian witness in all we do” (no. 13).

An important way to do this is through our participation in the public square. The bishops give a number of examples of how we can participate:

  • “running for office”
  • “working within political parties”
  • “communicating [our] concerns and positions to elected officials”
  • “joining diocesan social mission or advocacy networks [and] state Catholic conference initiatives”
  • “joining…community organizations,” and
  • “other efforts to apply authentic moral teaching in the public square” (no. 16)

This Fourth of July, let’s celebrate our dual roles—as disciples of Christ, and as Americans. Then let’s work to change the world.

Going Deeper

At FaithfulCitizenship.org, you can read the U.S. Catholic bishops’ statement on Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship and access resources to help your faith community participate, including videos, bulletin inserts, do’s and don’ts during election season, and more.

As we conclude the Fortnight for Freedom (June 21-July 4), reflect on the inspiring public witness of numerous saints and martyrs, including Blsd. Oscar Romero, St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, St. Maximillian Kolbe, Ven. Henriette Delille, and others.

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